Leonard Bernstein 8.25.13 Thought of the Day


English: Leonard Bernstein

English: Leonard Bernstein (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Louis Bernstein was born on this day in Lawrence, Massachusetts in 1918. Today is the 95th anniversary of his birth.

His parents, Jennie and Samuel Bernstein, were hard working Ukrainian  immigrants.  Although his birth cirtificate said ‘Louis’ everyone called him Leonard or Lenny. He officially changed his name when he was about 16.

His love affair with the piano began almost by accident when he was 10.

His Aunt Clara was going through a divorce and needed a place to store her massive upright piano. Lenny loved everything about the instrument, but his father refused to pay for lessons. Determined, the boy raised his own small pot of money to pay for a few sessions. He was a natural from the start, and by the time his bar mitzvah rolled around, his father was impressed enough to buy him a baby grand piano. The young Bernstein found inspiration everywhere and played with a voracity and spontaneity that impressed anyone who listened.  [Biography.com]

He attended Garrison Grammar School and Boston Latin School before going to Harvard University. In college he studies Music theory. 

In 1937, he attended a Boston Symphony concert conducted by Dmitri Mitropoulos. Bernstein’s heart sang when he saw the bald Greek man gesture with his bare hands, exuding a rare kind of enthusiasm for every score. At a reception the next day, Mitropoulos heard Bernstein play a sonata, and he was so moved by the young man’s abilities that he invited him to attend his rehearsals. Leonard spent a week with him. After the experience, Bernstein was determined to make music the center of his life. [Ibid]

After Harvard he went on to  the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia to study conducting with Fritz Reiner and  Berkshire Music Center at Tanglewood.

Leonard Bernstein, 1944

Leonard Bernstein, 1944 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

He landed a job with the New York Philharmonic and conducted his first concert on November 14, 1943. He went on to conduct internationally.

Bernstein wrote his first operetta, Candide in 1956. His second work for the stage was a collaboration with Jerome Robbins, Arthur Laurents andStephen Sondheim, the beloved musical West Side Story. When it opened, the show garnered unanimous rave reviews, matched only by its movie version released in 1961. [Ibid]

Here’s a two hour plus concert presentation of Candide…

And here’s a cool 10 minute mash up of modern day and original Broadway casts of West Side Story rehearsing for a Broadway Cares event…

[ANITA! 3:46  she still rocks!]  [Click here to see my BioBlog on Secondary Character Saturday: Anita]

Rehearsal photo for West Side Story

Rehearsal photo for West Side Story (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Advertisements

About ritalovestowrite

Freelance writer and graphic designer in Northern Baltimore County. As a writer I enjoy both fiction and non fiction (travel and local interest stories.) Most recently my non fiction writing has been featured in Mason-Dixon ARRIVE Magazine. As a graphic designer I focus on cover designs and have done a number of designs for books and magazines. Recently I've entered the e-book cover field. I also enjoy working with community organizations and churches to bring their communications to a higher standard. As an advocate for the ARTS, one of my biggest passions is helping young people find a voice in all the performing arts. To that end it has been my honor to give one on one lessons to middle and high school students in graphic design and music. View all posts by ritalovestowrite

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: